Alloy Artifacts  

Pliers and Cutters

Sears had offered a wide selection of pliers since well before the Craftsman era, and in the Modern Era continued to expand its selection.

Two new categories of pliers became available during this period: the "Lever-Jaw" pliers based on the "Vise-Grip" design, and "Arc-Joint" tongue-and-groove pliers based on the "Channellock" design.

New styles of pliers also included Craftsman long-reach pointed nose (assembly) pliers in 1949, Dunlap bent needlenose pliers in 1952, and Craftsman end nippers in 1953. (End nippers were sold during the Craftman Vanadium era, but were not listed in the catalogs.)

As Craftsman tools entered the Modern Era, Sears adopted the "Nested Diamonds" pattern as their standard gripping pattern for pliers. This appears to have been an active decision on Sears' part, and for a period during the 1950s even Wilde was forced to switch from their preferred "Rope Banded" pattern. By 1959 though Sears had relented, and Wilde production switched back to their traditional "Rope Banded" pattern.

Production by Wilde Tool

The Wilde Tool Company was the dominant supplier of slip-joint pliers for the Craftsman brand in the post-war era. Wilde production can be generally be recognized by the "Rope-Banded" gripping pattern on the handles, and by a P-Circle manufacturer's code stamped on (or forged into) the tools.


"Lever-Jaw" Locking Pliers

In the mid 1940s Sears began offering "Lever-Jaw" locking pliers based on the well-known "Vise-Grip" design. The Vise-Grip design dates back to the 1924 Petersen patent 1,489,458 and had been produced by the Petersen Manufacturing Company since that time. This patent expired in 1941, paving the way for competitors to make use of the design.

The "Lever-Jaw" pliers were produced by Parker Manufacturing and possibly other makers.

The terminology for the locking pliers changed a bit over the years. From the 1940s to mid 1950s Sears referred to these tools as a "Lever-Jaw Wrench", but by 1959 they had become a "Locking Plier Wrench", and in the 1960s they became simply locking pliers.


Craftsman "I-Circle" 10 Inch Locking Pliers with Release Lever

[Craftsman I-Circle 10 Inch Locking Pliers]
Fig. 43A. Craftsman "I-Circle" 10 Inch Locking Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 43A shows a pair of Craftsman 10 inch locking pliers with a release lever, stamped with "Craftsman" and an I-Circle code on the front, with "Made in U.S.A." on the back (not shown).

The overall length is 10.0 inches with the adjusting screw backed out, at which point the jaws could lock onto something about 1.3 inches wide. The finish is chrome plating with a matte finish.

The "I-Circle" code indicates production by Parker Manufacturing.

These pliers are fitted with a release lever, a feature first offered in 1959. Early production of this model was marked with the 1958 Waterbury patent RE24.465, which described the release lever design used by Parker.

The absence of a patent marking suggests production in 1960 or later, and the absence of a model number marking suggests production before 1970.

The 1966 Craftsman catalog listed locking pliers in two sizes, 7.5 and 10 inches, and the pliers were available with either straight or curved jaws. Our example is the 10 inch size with curved jaws, which was listed as model 45961.


Slip-Joint Pliers

In the post-war era Sears continued to offer several styles of slip-joint pliers, including combination pliers, angle-nose pliers, and waterpump pliers. In 1953 "Arc-Joint" tongue-and-groove pliers became available as well.


Craftsman [4536] "P-Circle" 6.75 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

[Craftsman 6.75 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers]
Fig. 43B. Craftsman [4536] 6.75 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1959-1969.

Fig. 43B shows a pair of Craftsman [4536] 6.75 inch slip-joint combination pliers, stamped with the double-line logo and a small "P" code near the pivot, and with "Alloy Steel" forged into the underside of the handles.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the rope-banded gripping pattern.

The lower inset shows the forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.7 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The rope-banded gripping pattern suggests production in 1959 or later, and the absence of a model number suggests production before 1970.

The 1959 Craftsman catalog offered these as model 4536 in just the 6.75 inch size, and the illustration showed the pliers with the "Rope-Banded" gripping pattern.

The 1964 Craftsman catalog offered the pliers in two sizes, with model 45360 for 6.75 inches and model 45361 for 8 inches.


Craftsman 45372 "WF" 6¾ Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers

[Craftsman 45372 WF ¾ Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers]
Fig. 43C. Craftsman 45372 "WF" 6¾ Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers, with Insets for Back Side and Side View, ca. Mid 1970s to Early 1980s.

Fig. 43C shows a pair of Craftsman 45372 6¾ inch slip-joint combination pliers, stamped with "=Craftsman=" plus the model number and "USA" near the pivot.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the dimpled gripping pattern.

The overall length is 6.7 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The pliers are also stamped with a "WF" manufacturer's code indicating production by Western Forge.

The model 45372 pliers were first listed in the 1973 Craftsman catalog and remained available until at least 1981.


Dunlap "Approved" [4507] 7 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers with Side Cutters

A review of the Craftsman catalogs found that Sears first offered the model 4507 pliers in 1947 under the Dunlap brand, with the description noting the flush rivet, alloy steel construction, and a blued finish. The pliers were available only in a 7 inch size.

In 1949 the 4507 pliers were offered under the Craftsman brand, and the model remained available until at least 1968.

The next two figures show examples of the pliers in both the Dunlap and Craftsman brands.

[Dunlap Approved 7 Inch Combination Pliers]
Fig. 44A. Dunlap "Approved" 7 Inch Combination Pliers, with Insets for Side View, Construction, and Marking Detail, ca. 1947.

Fig. 44A shows a pair of Dunlap 7 inch combination pliers with side cutters, stamped "Dunlap" and "Approved Tools" near the pivot.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the smooth handles.

The overall length is 7.6 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

Note that the rivet is flush on the front side.

These pliers are not marked with a model number, but based on the description in the 1947 Craftsman catalog, we think these are the model 4507 combination side cutting pliers.


Craftsman 4507 "B-Circle" 7 Inch Slip-Joint Combination Pliers with Side Cutters

[Craftsman 4507 7 Inch Combination Side-Cutting Pliers]
Fig. 44B. Craftsman 4507 7 Inch Combination Side-Cutting Pliers, with Insets for Back Side, Side View, and Marking Detail, ca. 1949 to 1960s.

Fig. 44B shows a pair of Craftsman 4507 combination side-cutting pliers, stamped with "Craftsman" and a "B-Circle" manufacturer's code, with "4507" and "USA" below (see lower right inset).

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern.

The overall length is 7.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel, with scattered pitting due to rust.

Note that the rivet is flush with the surface on the cutting side, allowing the pliers to cut close to a surface.

These pliers are a rare example of the "B-Circle" manufacturer's code, whose maker has not yet been determined.


Craftsman 4732 "LC" 8 Inch Slip-Joint Hose-Clamp Combination Pliers

[Craftsman 4732 8 Inch Slip-Joint Hose-Clamp Combination Pliers]
Fig. 45. Craftsman 4732 "LC" 8 Inch Slip-Joint Hose-Clamp Combination Pliers, with Insets for Side View, Jaw, and Marking Detail, 1965.

Fig. 45 shows a pair of Craftsman 4732 8 inch slip-joint hose-clamp combination pliers, stamped with "Craftsman" and the model number to the right of the pivot, with an "LC" code and "USA" below.

The handle also has a forged-in code "C35" faintly visible on the shoulder.

The overall length is 8.6 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The jaws of the pliers have a drilled recess and milled grooves to hold the ends of a hose-clamp spring (see middle inset), adding another useful feature to these otherwise conventional combination pliers.

The handles of these pliers have a double-chevron gripping pattern, similar to the older Herringbone pattern used by Danielson for a number of years. An example of this pattern on Proto production can be seen as the Proto 202 Combination Pliers. The forged-in "C35" is a Danielson date code probably indicates production in 1965, although a later decade may be possible.


Craftsman [4528] 8 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers

By 1947 the Craftsman catalog listed its former "angle-nose gripping pliers" as simply slip-joint pliers, with the same 4528 model number as the pre-war pliers. However, the description noted them as a combination plier-wrench.

At this time the pliers were available in two sizes, 6 and 8 inches.

[Craftsman 8 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers]
Fig. 46. Craftsman [4528] 8 Inch Angle-Nose Gripping Pliers, with Insets for Handle and Marking Detail, ca. 1945.

Fig. 46 shows a pair of Craftsman 8 inch angle-nose gripping pliers, marked with a transitional form of the double-line logo resembling "== U.S.A. ==".

No manufacturer's code was found on these pliers.

The overall length is 8.0 inches.

The finish is polished steel with no plating, which together with the double-line logo suggests a manufacturing date around 1945.

The handle pattern closely resembles the "Nested Diamonds" pattern found on many Craftsman Vanadium pliers. (See our article on Early Craftsman Pliers for examples.) The design of the pliers resembles the Wilde Wrench Pliers shown on another page.


Craftsman [4471] "P-Circle" 11 Inch Waterpump Pliers

[Craftsman 11 Inch Waterpump Pliers]
Fig. 47. Craftsman [4471] 11 Inch Waterpump Pliers, with Inset for Handle Pattern, ca. 1959-1969.

Fig. 47 shows a pair of Craftsman 11 inch waterpump pliers, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo but without a model number.

The pliers are also marked with a forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles (not shown).

The inset shows the "Rope-Banded" gripping pattern on the handles.

The overall length is 10.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The pliers are marked with the Craftsman double-line logo, but no model number is marked. Model numbers were generally marked on Craftsman tools after the late 1960s to early 70s, so these pliers were probably made in the late 1950s to 1960s.

The 1959 Craftsman catalog referred to model 4471 as a "King-size Heavy Duty Plier Wrench" in a 12 inch size, and the illustration showed the pliers with "Rope-Banded" handles.

The forged-in "P" code indicates production by Wilde, and the "Rope-Banded" gripping pattern suggests production in 1959 or later. The absence of a model number suggests production before 1970.


Craftsman "N-Square" 4-Position 10 Inch Waterpump Pliers

[Craftsman 4-Position 10 Inch Waterpump Pliers]
Fig. 48. Craftsman 4-Position 10 Inch Waterpump Pliers, with Inset for Back Side Detail, ca. 1947.

Fig. 48 shows a pair of Craftsman 10 inch waterpump pliers with an unusual 4-position adjustment mechanism.

The pliers are stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the handle, with "Forged in U.S.A." and an N-Square manufacturer's code on the back side.

The overall length is 9.9 inches fully extended, and the finish is chrome plating.

The distinctive adjustment mechanism uses a tabbed pivot post operating in slotted holes. To change the setting, the handles are opened wide to align the tabs with the slots, allowing the handles to be separated and then reinserted in the desired hole. (These aren't really "slip-joint" pliers, but we're grouping them here for now.)

Other tools with the N-Square manufacturer's code include punches and chisels, but the manufacturer associated with the code is not yet known.

Currently our only catalog reference for these pliers is the 1947 Craftsman tools catalog. The catalog notes the advantage of the adjustment mechanism in preventing accidental changes of the setting.


"Arc-Joint" Tongue-and-Groove Pliers

Tongue-and-groove pliers are an important sub-category of slip-joint pliers and were first offered by the Champion DeArment (now Channellock) company. The tongue-and-groove design dates back to the classic 1934 Manning patent 1,950,362, and when that patent expired in 1951, competitors were then free to make use of the design.

Sears offered its first models of "Arc-Joint" tongue-and-groove pliers in the 1953 Craftsman catalog. Most of the "Arc-Joint" pliers shown there were produced by Wilde Tool, and the rear cover of the catalog shows Craftsman "Arc-Joint" pliers with a clearly visible P-Circle manufacturer's code for Wilde. (It's rare for a Sears catalog to reveal the manufacturer.)

The 1953 catalog also offered Dunlap "Arc-Joint" pliers, and these are known to have been made by McKaig-Hatch.

In 1970 Sears registered "ARC JOINT" as a trademark.

The next several figures show examples of Craftsman "Arc-Joint" tongue-and-groove pliers.


Craftsman [4545] 6 Inch "Arc-Joint" Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers

[Craftsman 6 Inch Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers]
Fig. 49. Craftsman [4545] 6 Inch Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1953-1958.

Fig. 49 shows an earlier pair of Craftsman 6 inch tongue-and-groove angle-nose pliers with the older "Nested Diamonds" geometric gripping pattern on the handles.

The pliers are stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo near the pivot, with a P-Circle logo below.

The overall length is 6.8 inches fully extended, and the finish is chrome plating.

The stamped P-Circle code identifies the maker as Wilde, and the unusual (for Wilde) use of the geometric gripping pattern suggests transitional production.

The 1953 Craftsman catalog listed this as model 4545 "Mechanics' Arc-Joint Pliers", but the shape is similar to the older angle-nose gripping pliers.

The Craftsman tool catalog illustrations show that this "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern remained in use on some pliers into the 1960s, but the tongue-and-groove models had switched to the "Rope-Banded" pattern by 1959.


[Craftsman 6 Inch Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers]
Fig. 50. Craftsman [4545] 6 Inch Tongue-and-Groove Angle-Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 50 shows a later pair of Craftsman 6 inch tongue-and-groove angle-nose pliers with a rope-banded gripping pattern on the handles.

The pliers are stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo near the pivot, with a forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles.

The overall length is 6.8 inches fully extended, and the finish is chrome plating.

The forged-in "P" code on the underside of the handles represents the P-Circle manufacturer's code for Wilde. By 1960 the Craftsman tool catalogs had illustrations of these tongue-and-groove pliers with the rope-banded gripping pattern.


Craftsman [4527] "P-Circle" 10 Inch "Arc-Joint" Tongue-and-Groove Waterpump Pliers

[Craftsman 10 Inch Arc-Joint Tongue-and-Groove Waterpump Pliers]
Fig. 51. Craftsman [4527] 10 Inch "Arc-Joint" Tongue-and-Groove Waterpump Pliers, with Insets for Handle Pattern and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1950s to 1960s.

Fig. 51 shows a pair of Craftsman [4527] 10 inch tongue-and-groove waterpump pliers, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo, but without a model number.

The underside of the handles is also marked with a forged-in "P" code, as shown in the left inset.

The right inset shows the "Rope-Banded" gripping pattern on the handles, the long-standing "house pattern" for Wilde.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The "Rope-Banded" gripping pattern was used for Arc-Joint pliers after the late 1950s, and the absence a model number marking suggests production before 1970.


Craftsman 45381 "WF" 9.5 Inch "Arc-Joint" Waterpump Pliers

[Craftsman 45381 WF 9.5 Inch Arc-Joint Waterpump Pliers]
Fig. 52. Craftsman 45381 "WF" 9.5 Inch "Arc-Joint" Waterpump Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1980s.

Fig. 52 shows a pair of Craftsman 45381 9.5 inch "Arc-Joint" (tongue-and-groove) waterpump pliers with black plastic hand grips, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo and "USA".

The overall length is 10.1 inches fully extended, and the finish is chrome plating.

The pliers are also stamped with a "WF" code, indicating production by Western Forge.

The 1985 Craftsman catalog lists the model 45381 pliers and notes the vinyl hand grips.


Lineman's Pliers


Craftsman [4518] "C-Circle" 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Craftsman 4518 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 53. Craftsman [4518] 8.5 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Back Side, Side View, and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1940s to 1950s.

Fig. 53 shows a pair of Craftsman [4518] 8.5 inch lineman's pliers, stamped with "Craftsman" and "U.S.A." around the pivot.

The undersides of the handles have a forged-in "C-Circle" mark near the end, as seen in the lower inset.

The pliers also have a forged-in "0" code on the underside of the handle, as seen in the small middle inset.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the distinctive "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern on the handles.

The overall length is 8.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

Note that the leading "C" of the "Craftsman" marking is no longer extended to suggest the underline logo used in the earlier "Craftsman Vanadium" generation. The marking style with "Craftsman" and "U.S.A." around the pivot is believed to be representative for post-war fixed-pivot pliers, a time when slip-joint pliers were generally marked with the "=Craftsman=" logo.


Needlenose Pliers


Craftsman [4517] "C-Circle" 8 Inch Short-Jaw Chain Nose Pliers

The next figure shows a rarely-seen example of Craftsman short-jaw chain nose pliers, sometimes called "assembly" pliers.

[Craftsman 4517 C-Circle 8 Inch Short-Jaw Chain Nose Pliers]
Fig. 53B. Craftsman [4517] "C-Circle" 8 Inch Short-Jaw Chain Nose Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1940s.

Fig. 53B shows a pair of Craftsman 8 inch short-jaw chain nose or "assembly" pliers, stamped "Craftsman" and "Made in U.S.A." near the pivot.

The lower handle has a forged-in "0" code visible near the center.

The underside of each handle is also marked with a forged-in "C-Circle" code, as seen in the lower inset.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern.

The overall length is 7.8 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

Currently our earliest reference for these pliers is the 1949 Craftsman catalog, which listed this style as the No. 4517 "Long-reach Pointed Nose Pliers".

The "C-Circle" marking was recently (2024) identified as the manufacturer's code for Champion DeArment. See the section on Maker Champion DeArment for more information.

The "Made in U.S.A." marking suggests production in the late 1940s.


Battery Pliers

Sears offered battery pliers as model 4476 in a 7 inch size.


Craftsman 4476 "B-Circle" Battery Pliers with Nested-Diamond Pattern

[Craftsman 4476 Battery Pliers]
Fig. 54A. Craftsman 4476 Battery Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1940s to Early 1960s.

Fig. 54A shows a pair of Craftsman 4476 battery pliers with the "Nested-Diamond" gripping pattern, stamped with "Craftsman" and "4476 USA", and with a B-Circle manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 7.4 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The upper inset shows the "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern on the handles, which remained in use at least through the early 1960s.

These pliers are copies of the more familiar Wilde Battery Pliers, but were made with slightly different production and marking characteristics. Note that the parting line from the forging is visible through the impressed handle pattern.

Model 4476 battery pliers in this angle-nose style were listed in the 1947 Craftsman tool catalog, and this model continued to be offered through the 1962 catalog. Note though that the model number marking on these pliers is unusual for this era.

The manufacturer of the B-Circle code has not yet been identified.


Craftsman [4476] "P-Circle" Battery Pliers with Nested-Diamond Pattern

[Craftsman 4476 Battery Pliers]
Fig. 54. Craftsman [4476] Battery Pliers, with Inset for Side View, ca. Late 1940s to Early 1960s.

Fig. 54 shows a pair of Craftsman [4476] battery pliers with the Nested-Diamond handle pattern, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo and a P-Circle manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 7.4 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The upper inset shows the "Nested Diamonds" gripping pattern on the handles, which remained in use at least through the early 1960s.

Battery pliers in this angle-nose style were listed as model 4476 in the 1947 Craftsman tool catalog, and this model continued to be offered through the 1962 catalog. The P-Circle code identifies the maker as Wilde Tool, and similar but much earlier pliers made by Wilde can be seen as the Early Craftsman Battery Pliers.


Adjustable and Pipe Wrenches


Adjustable Wrenches

In the post-war years Craftsman adjustable wrenches are known to have been supplied by McKaig-Hatch, J.H. Williams, Western Forge, and at least one Japanese maker in the "BF" series. (There may be other makers yet to be identified.)


Craftsman "Y-Circle" 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench

The next two figures show examples of a series of adjustable wrenches offered during the 1950s, notable for the distinctive placement of the hanging hole in the interior of the shank, rather than at the extreme end. This style of adjustable wrench was illustrated in Craftsman catalogs from 1951 to 1957, but was not offered in 1960.

[Craftsman Y-Circle 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 56. Craftsman "Y-Circle" 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1951-1957.

Fig. 56 shows a Craftsman 8 inch adjustable wrench, marked with "8 In." and the Craftsman double-line logo forged into the front, with a "Forged in U.S.A." and a Y-Circle logo forged into the back side.

The overall length is 8.1 inches, and the maximum opening is 0.9 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.47 inches.

The finish is plain steel with traces of plating, possibly zinc or cadmium.

Note that the hanging hole is located in the interior of the depressed panel, rather than at the extreme end.


Craftsman "Y-Circle" 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Craftsman Y-Circle 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 57. Craftsman "Y-Circle" 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1951-1957.

Fig. 57 shows a Craftsman 12 inch adjustable wrench, marked with "12 In." and the Craftsman double-line logo forged into the front, with a "Forged in U.S.A." and a Y-Circle logo forged into the back side.

The overall length is 12.1 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.3 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.72 inches.

The wrench has a bright plated finish that resembles zinc, and the finish is soft enough to leave a mark on paper.

The upper inset shows a close-up of the Y-Circle logo forged into the shank.

The manufacturer associated with the Y-Circle code was recently (2024) identified as McKaig-Hatch, and discussion of the evidence for the attribution can be found in the section Tracking Maker "Y-Circle".

McKaig-Hatch also supplied Craftsman adjustable wrenches with a conventional ringed hanging hole.


Craftsman "AZ-Circle" 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench

The next several figures show examples of Williams adjustable wrenches produced for the Craftsman brand.

[Craftsman 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 58. Craftsman 8 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1955-1967.

Fig. 58 shows a Craftsman 8 inch adjustable wrench with a locking pin, marked with "Patd in U.S.A." and the Craftsman double-line logo forged into the front, with "Made in U.S.A." and an AZ-Circle logo forged into the back side.

The overall length is 8.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.0 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.47 inches.

The finish is chrome plating, with minor losses due to rust and wear.

The middle inset shows a close-up of the AZ-Circle logo forged into the shank.

The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the square shoulder used for the sliding jaw and keyway. The square shoulder is a feature patented by J.H. Williams in the 1930s (see patent #2,112,840) and is not known to have been used by any other manufacturers.

The patent notice refers to patent #2,719,449, filed by W.J. Johnson in 1953 and issued in 1955. This patent describes a locking mechanism for adjustable wrenches, actuated by pushing a locking pin (visible in the photograph) through the thumb knurl. An example of a Williams wrench with this locking mechanism can be seen as the Williams APL-6 Adjustable Wrench.


Craftsman "AZ-Circle" 10 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench

[Craftsman 10 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 59. Craftsman 10 Inch Locking Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1955-1967.

Fig. 59 shows a Craftsman 10 inch adjustable wrench with a locking pin, marked with "Patd in U.S.A." and the Craftsman double-line logo forged into the front, with "Made in U.S.A." and an AZ-Circle logo forged into the back side.

The overall length is 10.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.2 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.60 inches.

The finish is chrome plating, with some losses due to rust and pitting.

The middle inset shows a close-up of the "AZ-Circle" logo forged into the shank.

The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, illustrating the square shoulder used for the sliding jaw and keyway. The square shoulder is a feature patented by J.H. Williams in the 1930s (see patent #2,112,840) and is not known to have been used by any other manufacturers.

The patent notice refers to patent #2,719,449, filed by W.J. Johnson in 1953 and issued in 1955. This patent describes a locking mechanism for adjustable wrenches, actuated by pushing a locking pin (visible in the photograph) through the thumb knurl. An example of a Williams wrench with this locking mechanism can be seen as the Williams APL-6 Adjustable Wrench.


Craftsman "JW" 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Craftsman 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 60. Craftsman 8 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1968-1972.

Fig. 60 shows a Craftsman 8 inch adjustable wrench, stamped "Forged" on the front with "Made in U.S.A." and "JW - Alloy" on the back side. The back side shank also shows a forged-in code "L" next to the hole.

The overall length is 8.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.0 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.50 inches.

The finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, and a close look shows the square shoulder for the sliding jaw and keyway. The square shoulder was a patented feature of the J.H. Williams adjustable wrenches, and is not known to have been used by any other manufacturers.

This wrench can be identified as Williams' production by the square-shouldered keyway, and the stamped "JW" code further confirms the maker. The forged-in "L" code has also been observed on J.H. Williams wrenches; see for example the Williams AP-8 "Superjustable" Wrench.

This particular wrench is believed to have been purchased new in the late 1960s to early 1970s, a time before Craftsman began marking model numbers on its tools. The next figure shows a similar wrench with a Craftsman model number.


Craftsman 44604 "JW" 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Craftsman 44604 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 61. Craftsman 44604 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1970+.

Fig. 61 shows a somewhat later example of Williams' production, a Craftsman 44604 10 inch adjustable wrench.

The shank is stamped with "-Craftsman-" and "Forged" on the front, with "Made in U.S.A." and "JW - Alloy" on the back side.

A forged-in code "L" appears on the back side as well.

The upper inset shows a side view of the wrench, with the square shoulder visible on the sliding jaw and keyway.

The overall length is 10.2 inches, and the maximum opening is 1.2 inches. The head thickness was measured at 0.60 inches.

The finish is chrome plating with polished faces.


Craftsman 44604 "WF" 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Craftsman 44604 WF 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 61B. Craftsman 44604 "WF" 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Back Side, Side View, and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1970s to 1980s.

Fig. 61B shows a later Craftsman 44604 10 inch adjustable wrench, marked with the "=Craftsman=" logo forged into the front, with "Forged in USA" and the model number forged into the back.

The back side also has a forged-in "WF" code near the hanging hole, as seen in the lower inset.

The overall length is 10.1 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

One construction detail to note is that the pin for the adjusting knurl is permanently crimped in place.

The "WF" code indicates production by Western Forge.


Pipe Wrenches

In the post-war years Craftsman pipe wrenches were all of the Ridgid-pattern design with a one-piece handle and frame, with the exception of a "streamlined" design offered for a few years in the mid 1950s. These wrenches were described as heavy-duty or sometimes "professional quality".

Craftsman pipe wrenches from the mid 1940s to mid 1950s were supplied by a maker using an "AS" or T-Circle (or both) marking, and the catalog noted a finish in blue (1947) or gray (later years) paint. Another characteristic was the small round hanging hole.

Craftsman pipe wrenches are known to have been supplied by McKaig-Hatch during the 1950s, and some of these were produced with a distinctive "finger grip" handle.

In the late 1970s a U.S. based manufacturer supplied pipe wrenches marked with a "DM" code.

By 1978 Craftsman heavy-duty pipe wrenches were being supplied by a Japanese maker.

The above notes suggest that Sears used a number of different suppliers for pipe wrenches, and more research will be required to identify them.

Chain Pipe Wrenches

In addition to conventional pipe wrenches, Sears also offered Craftsman chain pipe wrenches.


Craftsman 55677 "DM" 14 Inch Heavy-Duty Pipe Wrench

[Craftsman 55677 DM 14 Inch Heavy-Duty Pipe Wrench]
Fig. 61C. Craftsman 55677 "DM" 14 Inch Heavy-Duty Pipe Wrench, with Insets for Back Side, Side View, and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1970s to 1980s.

Fig. 61C shows a Craftsman 55677 14 inch heavy-duty pipe wrench, marked with "Craftsman" and "Heavy Duty" cast into the front, with "Guaranteed" and "Made in U.S.A." plus the model number cast into the back.

The back also has a stamped "DM" code near the hanging hole, as seen in the right inset.

The overall length is 12.8 inches closed and 15.1 inches fully extended. The finish is plain steel and red paint.

The jaw is marked with "Alloy Steel" forged into one side and has graduated markings for the opening size (not shown).

The manufacturer associated with the "DM" code is not yet known.


Craftsman 55676 "DM" 24 Inch Heavy-Duty Pipe Wrench

[Craftsman 55679 DM 24 Inch Heavy-Duty Pipe Wrench]
Fig. 61D. Craftsman 55679 "DM" 24 Inch Heavy-Duty Pipe Wrench, with Insets for Back Side, Side View, and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1970s to 1980s.

Fig. 61D shows a Craftsman 55679 24 inch heavy-duty pipe wrench, marked with "Craftsman" and "Heavy Duty" cast into the front, with "Guaranteed" and "Made in U.S.A." plus the model number cast into the back.

The back also has a stamped "DM" code near the hanging hole, as seen in the right inset.

The overall length is 22.0 inches closed and approximately 25.4 inches fully extended. The finish is plain steel and red paint.

The jaw is marked with "Alloy Steel" forged into one side and has graduated markings for the opening size (not shown).

The manufacturer associated with the "DM" code is not yet known.


Craftsman "V" 12 Inch Chain Pipe Wrench

[Craftsman V 12 Inch Chain Pipe Wrench]
Fig. 61E. Craftsman "V" 12 Inch Chain Pipe Wrench, with Inset for Back Side Detail, ca. 1960s.

Fig. 61E shows a Craftsman 12 inch chain pipe wrench, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and "Pat. No. 2944452" plus a "V" code on the back side panel.

The overall length of the handle is 12.0 inches, and the length of the chain is 16.3 inches. The finish is chrome plating.

The patent notice refers to patent 2,944,452, filed by R.W. Vose in 1959 and issued in 1960, with assignment to Moore Drop Forging.


Chisels and Punches


Craftsman "N-Square" 3/16 Pin Punch

[Craftsman 3/16 Pin Punch]
Fig. 62. Craftsman 3/16 Pin Punch.

Fig. 62 shows a Craftsman 3/16 pin punch, stamped with the double-line logo and an "N-Square" manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 6.1 inches.

The manufacturer associated with the "N-Square" code is not yet known. This code has also been noted on a Dunlap Punch shown in a later figure.


Craftsman "G-Circle" 3/4 Star Drill

[Craftsman 3/4 Star Drill]
Fig. 63. Craftsman 3/4 Star Drill, with Inset for Marking Detail.

Fig. 63 shows a Craftsman 3/4 star drill, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo and a "G-Circle" manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 11.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The manufacturer associated with the "G-Circle" code is not yet known.


Craftsman 4283 "WF" 16 Inch Pry Bar and Alignment Punch

[Craftsman 4283 WF Pry Bar]
Fig. 63B. Craftsman 4283 "WF" 16 Inch Pry Bar and Alignment Punch, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. 1970s to 1980s.

Fig. 63B shows a Craftsman 4283 "WF" 16 inch pry bar and alignment punch, stamped with "U.S.A." and "=Craftsman=" on the shank, with "Wear Safety Goggles" and the model number on the opposite side.

The overall length is 16.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The shank is also stamped with a "WF" code, indication production by Western Forge.

The pry bar is constructed from 1/2 square stock and has an angled 5/8 flat blade at one end, with a tapered punch at the other end.


Tin Snips


Craftsman 45463 "X" 7 Inch "Duckbill" Combination-Pattern Tin Snips

[Craftsman 45463 X 7 Inch Tin Snips]
Fig. 64A. Craftsman 45463 "X" 7 Inch Combination-Pattern Tin Snips, with Inset for Marking Detail, ca. Late 1970s to Early 1980s.

Fig. 64A shows a pair of Craftsman 45463 7 inch combination-pattern tin snips, stamped with the "Craftsman" logo and "Made in U.S.A.", and with an "X" code to the left of the model number.

The overall length is 7.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel with plastic grips.

The "X" code indicates production by Midwest Tool & Cutlery, a major maker of tin snips, shears, and related tools.

The term "Duckbill" for tin snips is a reference to the combination-pattern jaws, which allow both straight and circular cuts in either direction.

The Craftsman catalogs had offered Duckbill snips since at least 1947 under model 4546, with three sizes 7, 10, and 12 inches available. (In the late 1940s a 13½ size was also offered.)

The 1972 Craftsman catalog offered the snips as models 45463, 45461, and 45462 for sizes 7, 10, and 12 inches respectively.


Craftsman 45461 "X" 10 Inch "Duckbill" Combination-Pattern Tin Snips

[Craftsman 45461 X 10 Inch Tin Snips]
Fig. 64B. Craftsman 45461 "X" 10 Inch Combination Pattern Tin Snips, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1970s to Early 1980s.

Fig. 64B shows a pair of Craftsman 45461 10 inch combination-pattern tin snips, stamped with the "Craftsman" logo and "Made in U.S.A.", and with an "X" code to the left of the model number.

The top inset shows a top view of the combination pattern jaws.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the finish is plain steel with plastic grips.

The "X" code indicates production by Midwest Tool & Cutlery, a major maker of tin snips, shears, and related tools.

Our earliest reference for model 45461 is the 1964 Craftsman catalog, which listed them as "Duckbill Snips".


Craftsman 4273 "X" Right-Cutting Compound-Leverage "Aviation" Snips

[Craftsman 4273 Right-Cutting Aviation Snips]
Fig. 64C. Craftsman 4273 Right-Cutting "Aviation" Snips, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail, ca. Late 1970s.

Fig. 64C shows a pair of Craftsman 4273 right-cutting "aviation" snips, stamped with "Craftsman" and the model number above "Made in U.S.A." and "Cuts Right".

The snips are also stamped with an "X" manufacturer's code to the left of the model number.

The top inset shows a side view of the snips.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the finish is polished chrome with plastic grips.

Sears had offered Craftsman compound-leverage "aviation" snips since at least 1947, and in the 1960s the aviation snips appeared with plastic handles. By 1969 the Craftsman catalogs were illustrating plastic grips with raised "horns".

The distinctive plastic hand grips with the raised "horns" have the same design as aviation snips made by Midwest Tool & Cutlery, allowing us to identify Midwest Tool as the maker. Midwest Tool is a major manufacturer of tin snips, shears, and related tools.


Other Tools


Craftsman 8-In-1 Multi-Socket Wrench

[Craftsman 8-In-1 Multi-Socket Wrench]
Fig. 65. Craftsman 8-In-1 Multi-Socket Wrench, with Inset for Back Side Detail, ca. 1954-1968.

Fig. 65 shows a Craftsman 8-In-1 multi-socket wrench, marked with the Craftsman double-line logo on the raised panel, and with the fractional sizes and "Forged in U.S.A." on the back side panel.

The socket sizes are 7/16, 1/2, 9/16, and 19/32 on the small head, with 5/8, 11/16, 3/4, and 7/8 on the large head.

The overall length is 10.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

A close comparison with the Williams No. 1999 Multi-Socket Wrench showed that the tools are virtually identical except for markings, confirming that Williams was the contract manufacturer for Sears for this tool. The small forged-in "T" code to the left of the panel is one of several forge codes used by Williams (the others include B, II, O, and V) and is not interpreted as a Craftsman manufacturer's code.

The Craftsman 8-In-1 wrench was first introduced in the 1954 catalog at a price of $3.98. By 1957 the price had been reduced to $2.98, and the 8-In-1 model remained available at least through 1968, with the price gradually rising to $3.99 in 1968.


Craftsman [4735] "P-Circle" Snap-Ring Pliers

[Craftsman 4735 Snap-Ring Pliers]
Fig. 66. Craftsman [4735] Snap-Ring Pliers, with Insets for Side View and Marking Detail.

Fig. 66 shows a pair of Craftsman snap-ring (or lock-ring) specialty pliers, stamped with the "=Craftsman=" logo and "USA", and with a small "P" in a circle code.

The top inset shows a side view of the pliers, illustrating the "Rope-Banded" gripping pattern.

The lower inset shows the forged-in "P" code (in a circular depression) on the inside of the handles.

The overall length is 9.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The 1966 Craftsman catalog listed these as No. 4735 lock-ring pliers.

The "Rope-Banded" gripping pattern and P-Circle code indicate production by Wilde.


Craftsman [47395] "P-Circle" Brake Spring Pliers

[Craftsman 47395 Brake Spring Pliers]
Fig. 67. Craftsman [47395] Brake Spring Pliers, with Insets for Construction and Marking Detail.

Fig. 67 shows a pair of Craftsman [47395] brake spring pliers, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the upper jaw, with a small P-Circle code below.

The overall length is 13.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The "P-Circle" code indicates production by Wilde.


Craftsman 93558 "I-Circle" Adjustable Hacksaw

[Craftsman 93558 Hacksaw]
Fig. 68. Craftsman 93558 Hacksaw, with Inset for Marking Detail, ca. 1970.

Fig. 68 shows a Craftsman 9 3558 adjustable hacksaw, stamped with the Craftsman "Crown" logo and "Made in USA" on the frame, with an I-Circle manufacturer's code at the right.

The overall length is 16.8 inches with a 10 inch blade installed. The finish is chrome plating.

The frame has two adjustment positions to accept 10 and 12 inch blades.

The I-Circle code indicates production by Parker Manufacturing.

We reviewed the Craftsman catalogs and found that the model 9 3558 hacksaw was listed from 1966 until at least 1977. Up through 1971 this model was considered as the top-of-the-line, with the descriptions typically noting "Professional" quality. The catalog illustrations all display the "=Craftsman=" logo on the frame.

The Craftsman "Crown" logo on our example is somewhat unusual, as this logo is more commonly found on tool boxes. In seeking to explain the unexpected logo, we noticed that the 1969 and 1970 catalogs had tagged the listing for the model 9 3558 hacksaw with "Craftsman Commercial" in a "Crown" logo. (An earlier section has an explanation of this Craftsman Commercial designation.)

Only a few of the tools in the catalog were tagged as "Craftsman Commercial", and our hypothesis is that tools receiving this special designation were allowed to use the "Crown" logo, or a full "Craftsman Commercial" tag in the case of power tools.

If this is the case, the unusual logo on our example here would indicate that it was produced in 1969 or 1970, and the model number marking then indicates production in 1970.

We reviewed a number of online photos of this style of Craftsman hacksaw and the observed markings seem support our hypothesis. The observed examples could be placed in four groups:


Craftsman Ratcheting Box-End Wrenches

Sears first offered Craftsman ratcheting box wrenches in the 1949 catalog, where they were termed "Ratchet Wrenches". The wrenches were designed with a clam-shell case held together by rivets, with a raised panel in the center stamped "Craftsman". The catalog noted the use of alloy steel in the construction.

Beginning in the mid 1960s the terminology changed slightly and the tools were called "Ratcheting Box-End Wrenches". The wrenches continued to be offered through 1969.

Based on the known examples, these tools were made by Duro/Indestro. Some examples were stamped with a "D.I." code for Duro/Indestro, and the wrenches match the illustrations in the Duro and Indestro catalogs. (Oddly though, the ratcheting box wrenches were not listed in the Duro/Indestro catalogs until the 1960s.)

By 1973 Craftsman ratcheting box wrenches were again available, but in a different design made by Parker Manufacturing.


Craftsman 1/4x5/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench

[Craftsman 1/4x5/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench]
Fig. 69. Craftsman 1/4x5/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1949+.

Fig. 69 shows a Craftsman 1/4x5/16 ratcheting box wrench with raised panels, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the panel. The body is stamped "Made U.S.A." at the left, with "Reg. U.S. Pat. Off." at the right.

The overall length is 4.6 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of the wrench uses symmetrical stamped steel formed panels held together by rivets. The raised panel in the center of each half is a distinctive feature found in the Duro/Indestro production of ratcheting box wrenches.

Ratcheting box wrenches in this design were listed in the Craftsman tool catalogs as early as 1949.


Craftsman "D.I." 3/8x7/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench

[Craftsman 3/8x7/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench]
Fig. 70. Craftsman 3/8x7/16 Ratcheting Box Wrench, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1949+.

Fig. 70 shows a Craftsman 3/8x7/16 ratcheting box wrench with raised panels, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the panel.

The body is stamped "Made U.S.A." at the left, with "Reg. U.S. Pat. Off." and a "D.I." code at the right.

The overall length is 6.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of the wrench uses symmetrical stamped steel formed panels held together by rivets. The raised panel in the center of each half is a distinctive feature found in the Duro/Indestro production of ratcheting box wrenches, and the "D.I." code is believed to denote "Duro Indestro".


Craftsman 13/16x7/8 Ratcheting Box Wrench

[Craftsman 13/16x7/8 Ratcheting Box Wrench]
Fig. 70B. Craftsman 13/16x7/8 Ratcheting Box Wrench, with Inset for Side View, ca. 1949+.

Fig. 70B shows a Craftsman 13/16x7/8 ratcheting box wrench with raised panels, stamped with the Craftsman double-line logo on the panel. The body is stamped "Made U.S.A." at the left, with "Reg. U.S. Pat. Off." code at the right.

The overall length is 9.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of the wrench uses symmetrical stamped steel formed panels held together by rivets. The raised panel in the center of each half is a distinctive feature found in the Duro/Indestro production of ratcheting box wrenches.

Note that this particular example is not marked with a "D.I." code seen in the previous figure.


Later Craftsman 42174 14x15mm Ratcheting Box Wrench

This next figure shows a later Craftsman ratcheting box wrench made by A&E Manufacturing, complete with a Snap-on style date code.

[Craftsman 42174 14x15mm Ratcheting Box Wrench]
Fig. 71. Craftsman 42174 14x15mm Ratcheting Box Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, 2000.

Fig. 71 shows a Craftsman 42174 14x15mm ratcheting box wrench, stamped "Craftsman" and "Made in U.S.A." on the front, with a "Pat. No. 2,500,835" patent notice on the back side.

The back side is also stamped with a hexagon symbol to the right of the patent notice, which is a stylized "0" date code for 2000 in the Snap-on date code system.

The top inset shows the laminated and riveted construction of the wrench.

The overall length is 8.2 inches, and the finish is polished chrome plating.

The patent notice cites patent #2,500,835, filed by John W. Lang in 1947 and issued in 1950. The patent had long since expired when this wrench was made, but the patent citation can be regarded as a manufacturer's code for A&E.


Dunlap and Other Brands

Sears continued to use the Dunlap brand for economy tools into the early 1960s, but by 1964 the Craftsman catalog no longer included Dunlap tools.

Other brands used for tools during the Modern Era included "Companion" and the "Sears" name itself.


Dunlap Tools

A wide variety of Dunlap brand economy tools were offered during the 1940s and 1950s, and the brand continued to be available until about 1963.


Dunlap "N-Square" 5/8 Flat Chisel

[Dunlap 5/8 Flat Chisel]
Fig. 72. Dunlap 5/8 Flat Chisel, with Inset for Side View.

Fig. 72 shows a Dunlap 5/8 flat chisel, stamped with the Dunlap logo and "Made in U.S.A." with the fractional size on the square shank, and with an "N-Square" manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 6.4 inches, and the finish is nickel plating.

The top inset shows a side view of the chisel, illustrating the parting line on the edge of the tip, an indication of drop-forged construction.


Dunlap "N-Square" Center Punch

[Dunlap 3/8 Center Punch]
Fig. 73. Dunlap 3/8 Center Punch.

Fig. 73 shows a Dunlap brand 3/8 center punch, stamped with the Dunlap logo and "U.S.A." on the square shank, and with an "N-Square" manufacturer's code.

The overall length is 4.8 inches.


Dunlap 13/16x7/8 Open-End Wrench

[Dunlap 13/16x7/8 Open-End Wrench]
Fig. 74A. Dunlap 13/16x7/8 Open-End Wrench, with Inset for Back Side, ca. Mid 1950s.

Fig. 74A shows a Dunlap 13/16x7/8 open-end wrench with gently-sloped depressed panels, marked with "Dunlap" and the fractional sizes forged into the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and the fractional sizes forged into the back side.

The front panel also has a forged-in code "C" visible at the left.

The overall length is 8.5 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The construction of this wrench closely resembles the Lectrolite "TruFit" wrenches produced in the late 1940s and 1950s, as for example the TruFit 11/16x3/4 Open-End Wrench. Note in particular the gently-sloped depressed panels.

The wrench is not marked with an "LC" code, but the general construction and the presence of a "C" code on the front panel are very similar to the other Dunlap "LC" examples here, strongly suggesting production by Lectrolite.


Dunlap "LC" 3/8x7/16 Offset Box-End Wrench

[Dunlap LC 3/8x7/16 Offset Box Wrench]
Fig. 74B. Dunlap "LC" 3/8x7/16 Offset Box Wrench, with Insets for Side View, Back Side, and Marking Detail, ca. Mid 1950s to Early 1960s.

Fig. 74B shows a Dunlap 3/8x7/16 offset box wrench with gently-sloped depressed panels, marked with "Dunlap" and the fractional sizes forged into the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and the fractional sizes forged into the back side.

The front panel also has a forged-in code "X" at the left and "LC" at the right end, seen as a close-up in the middle inset.

The overall length is 6.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of this wrench closely resembles the Lectrolite "TruFit" wrenches produced in the late 1940s and 1950s, as for example the TruFit 3/4x25/32 Offset Box Wrench. Note in particular the gently-sloped depressed panels and the increased width of the shank after the offset. The forged-in "LC" code is believed to represent "Lectrolite Corporation".


Dunlap "LC" 5/8 Combination Wrench

[Dunlap LC 5/8 Combination Wrench]
Fig. 75. Dunlap "LC" 5/8 Combination Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. Mid 1950s to Early 1960s.

Fig. 75 shows a Dunlap 5/8 combination wrench with depressed panels, marked with "Dunlap" and the fractional sizes forged into the front panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and the fractional sizes forged into the back side.

The front panel also has a forged-in code "T" at the left and "LC" at the right, shown as a close-up in the middle inset.

The overall length is 7.1 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The construction of this wrench closely resembles the Lectrolite "TruFit" combination wrenches produced in the late 1940s and 1950s, as for example the TruFit 9/16 Combination Wrench. Note in particular the gently-sloped depressed panels and the increased width of the shank at the junction with the box end. The forged-in "LC" code is believed to represent "Lectrolite Corporation".


Dunlap "Y-Circle" 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench

[Dunlap 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench]
Fig. 76. Dunlap 10 Inch Adjustable Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1950s.

Fig. 76 shows a Dunlap 10 inch adjustable wrench, marked with the Dunlap double-line logo and "Dependable Quality" forged into the shank, with "Forged in U.S.A." forged into the back side.

The shank is also marked with a forged-in Y-Circle logo, visible at the right near the hanging hole.

The overall length is 10.0 inches and the maximum opening is 1.1 inches. The finish is chrome plating.

On this wrench the pin securing the knurl is threaded on the outside (slotted) end, a detail also observed on other adjustable wrenches marked with the Y-Circle code.

The forged-in Y-Circle logo was recently (2024) identified as the manufacturer's code for McKaig-Hatch. The Y-Circle logo also appears on Craftsman adjustable wrenches, as for example the Craftsman "Y-Circle" 12 Inch Adjustable Wrench.


Sears Brand Tools

In more recent years Sears has used its own name for a line of economy tools, similar to the Dunlap tools of earlier years.


Sears "BF" 5/8 Combination Wrench

[Sears BF 5/8 Combination Wrench]
Fig. 77A. Sears "BF" 5/8 Combination Wrench, with Insets for Back Side and Side View, ca. 1960s+.

Fig. 77A shows a Sears 5/8 combination wrench with depressed panels, marked with "Sears" and the fractional size forged into the front panel, with "Drop Forged" and "BF Japan" plus the fractional size forged into the back side.

The overall length is 7.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating with polished faces.

The top inset shows a side view of the wrench. Note that the edge of the shank has been ground smooth, and the edges of the open-end are rounded and polished.

The "BF" code indicates that the tool was supplied by the Daido Corporation, a distributor representing a number of Japanese manufacturers.


Sears "BF" 11/16 Combination Wrench

[Sears BF 11/16 Combination Wrench]
Fig. 77B. Sears "BF" 11/16 Combination Wrench, with Insets for Side View and Back Side Detail, ca. 1960s+.

Fig. 77B shows a Sears 11/16 combination wrench with depressed panels, marked with "Sears" and the fractional size forged into the front panel, with "Drop Forged" and "BF Japan" plus the fractional size forged into the back side.

The overall length is 7.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The "BF" code indicates that the tool was supplied by the Daido Corporation, a distributor representing a number of Japanese manufacturers.


Sears 3079 "BF" 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers

[Sears 3079 BF 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers]
Fig. 78. Sears 3079 "BF" 7 Inch Lineman's Pliers, with Insets for Back Side and Edge View, ca. 1970s.

Fig. 78 shows a pair of Sears 3079 7 inch lineman's pliers, marked with "Sears" and the model number on the front, with "BF Japan" on the back side.

The overall length is 7.5 inches, and the finish is plain steel.

The "BF" code indicates that the tool was supplied by the Daido Corporation, a distributor representing a number of Japanese manufacturers.

The specific manufacturer may be the Three Peaks Giken Company, a Japanese maker known to have supplied pliers of this type for Daido's "Truecraft" brand.

The 1977 Craftsman catalog notes that the pliers were made of alloy steel with a polished head and plastic hand grips, and notes the Japanese origin. The 3079 pliers were listed at a $3.97 price, and the 8 inch model 3080 pliers were available at a $4.29 price.

We purchased these pliers new in the 1970s for a vehicle tool kit and they have provided good service over the years.


Companion Brand Tools

Sears occasionally used the "Companion" brand for economy tools, similar to its use of the "Sears" brand.


Companion "WF" 9mm Combination Wrench

[Companion WF 9mm Combination Wrench]
Fig. 79A. Companion "WF" 9mm Combination Wrench, with Insets Back Side and Side View, ca. 1970s.

Fig. 79A shows a Companion "WF" 9mm combination wrench with depressed panels, marked with "Companion" and the metric size forged into the front panel, with "Forged U.S.A." and the metric size forged into the back panel.

The back panel also has a forged-in "WF" code at the left.

The overall length is 4.5 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


Companion "WF" 10mm Combination Wrench

[Companion WF 10mm Combination Wrench]
Fig. 79B. Companion "WF" 10mm Combination Wrench, with Insets Back Side and Side View, ca. 1970s.

Fig. 79B shows a Companion "WF" 10mm combination wrench with depressed panels, marked with "Companion" and the metric size forged into the front panel, with "Forged U.S.A." and the metric size forged into the back panel.

The back panel also has a forged-in "WF" code at the left.

The overall length is 4.5 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


Companion 3812 "BF" Claw Hammer

Claw hammers are a bit outside of our main interests here at Alloy Artifacts, but we wanted to use this tool to illustrate the breadth of the tool selection sourced through "BF".

[Companion 3812 BF Claw Hammer]
Fig. 80. Companion 3812 "BF" Claw Hammer, with Insets for Marking Detail, ca. 1970s.

Fig. 80 shows a Companion 3812 claw hammer, stamped with "Companion" and "Forged" plus the model number on the head, with "Japan-BF" on the back.

The overall length is 12.9 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The tubular steel handle is fitted with a rubber cushion grip that makes the hammer comfortable to hold.

The "BF" code indicates that the tool was supplied by the Daido Corporation, a distributor representing a number of Japanese manufacturers.


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